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Chapter 11 Page 13

August 16th, 2015

On Chapter 11 Page 13, Blaise regrets being useful. Toothy Kit also discusses trade, or rather, the lack thereof. And what’s this mention of a treasure? Vote for us on Top Web Comics to see a sneak peek!


8 Comments »

    Introverted Chaos

    Shucks. Too bad Blaise has no means at his disposal of climbing high cliffs.

    msouth

    It’s like watching a recovering alcoholic get offered a drink.

    Crestlinger

    The trick if you Really want him to fix stuff is to get him overtired and he’ll do it to perfection in his sleep.

    Celidah

    DID SOMEONE SAY TREASURE??

    On another note, who wants to bet that the broken stuff was close to that condition when the tribe members traded for them because the Liranequois didn’t know they were getting a raw deal?

      Celidah

      Although now that I’ve already hit the “Reply” button, I’m second-guessing that now. I suppose it’s big leap to assume the Liranequois wouldn’t know if an unethical trader would try to swindle them.

        galadhion

        Your second guess is spot on. Native Americans of the Fur Trade era knew how much their furs were worth. They constantly played the Dutch off the English off the French. The European investors repeatedly tried to send over sub-par goods. The colonial traders kept sending back letters, asking for better quality goods. If the Indian trappers felt they were being cheated, they would switch to trading with another colonial power.

        This strategy worked well for the Iroquois until the English eliminated all the competition at the end of the French and Indian War. After that, things went downhill quickly for the native woodland nations.

          Celidah

          Aha. I didn’t know that detail about colonial trade, but it makes perfect sense.

          CaptEndo

          Seconding Galadhion there; many items for the Indian Fur Trade era were top quality. The muskets ranged from just as good as the Royal Army issue to fancy Fusil Fin grade arms, knives were good functional blades, axes were very common and as good as most settlers could get, and the ubiquitous blankets were made by companies still famous for them. The later local blacksmith made blades were often second grade, but this was much later in the19th century. Many of them were case hardened instead of having a good steel edge. This led to a tradition among the First Peoples of only sharpening one side of the blade so there would always be a steel edge instead of leaving soft iron.

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